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Talisman Sabre 2021 Smoking Ceremony at Lavarack Barracks

[supplied by Department of Defence]

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Mr. John Philips, a member of the Bindal clan, U.S Army Col. Jerry Hall, Deputy Exercise Director of Exercise Talisman Sabre 2021, and Bindal Elder Uncle Alfred Smallwood, pose for a photo at a Welcome to Country Ceremony at Lavarack Barracks, Townsville, Queensland. Image: supplied

Exercise Talisman Sabre 2021 (TS21) is the largest bilateral training activity between Australia and the United States, commencing on 14 July 2021.

 

Held every two years, TS21 aims to test Australian interoperability with the United States and other participating forces in complex warfighting scenarios. In addition to the United States, TS21 involves participating forces from Canada, Japan, Republic of Korea, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom.

 

The exercise includes a Field Training Exercise incorporating force preparation (logistic) activities, amphibious landings, ground force manoeuvres, urban operations, air combat and maritime operations. Activities will peak from 18 - 31 July across Queensland.

 

TS21 is a major undertaking for all attending nations and demonstrates the combined capability to achieve large-scale operational outcomes within a COVID-19 safe environment.

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