SOC08-Newsletter[29485].jpg

Strength of Indigenous authors in 2022 Australian Book Industry Awards

[by Shenae Ho]

ABIA_2022.jpg

Adam Goodes, Ellie Laing and David Hardy winners of ‘Children’s Picture Book of the Year (ages 0-6). Image: Monique Ferguson

The 2022 Australian Book Industry Awards (ABIAs) were announced on Thursday, 9 June at a star-studded gala at the International Convention and Exhibition Centre (ICC) in Darling Harbour.


The awards are judged by the ABIA Academy, comprising more than 250 publishers, booksellers, agents, media and industry representatives. The 2022 shortlist featured some of the biggest names in the Australian book industry (which publishes more than 7,000 new books annually) and this year’s list is a showcase of high-profile authors and incredible new and emerging talent.


The Australian Publishers Association is delighted to announce the 2022 ABIA winners:

 

• Presented by Wendy Whiteley, the 2022 ABIA Book of the Year Award went to Diana Reid for her debut novel Love & Virtue (Ultimo Press) at last night’s ABIAs that also won Literary Fiction Book of the Year. Critics have lauded Diana Reid’s novel as a formidable debut written with clarity and confidence. A powerful first-hand narrative, it presents a darkly funny yet unflinching glimpse of early adulthood and how it shapes us, while providing an important contribution to the growing discourse around consent. Love & Virtue won the MUD Literary Prize and has been shortlisted in the Indie Book Awards for Debut Fiction and the Booksellers’ Choice Fiction Book of the Year Award, as well as securing the Sydney Morning Herald’s Best Young Novelist Award. The Sydney Morning Herald described Love & Virtue as “a great read that will become an Australian classic.”

 

The strength of Indigenous authors and publishing was reflected in this year’s awards:

  • First Scientists: Deadly Inventions and Innovations from Australia’s First Peoples by Corey Tutt (Hardie Grant Publishing, Hardie Grant Explore) won Book of the Year for Younger children (ages 7-12).

  • Children’s Picture Book of the Year (0-6) went to Somebody’s Land: Welcome to Our Country by Adam Goodes and Ellie Laing, illustrated by David Hardy (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin).

  • Dropbear by Evelyn Araluen (University of Queensland Press, University of Queensland Press) took out Small Publishers Adult Book of the Year.

 

Female writers ruled the major categories:

  • Claiming General Fiction Book of the Year is Jacqueline Bublitz for Before You Knew My Name (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin).

  • Book of the Year for Older Children (ages 13+) went to Lynette Noni for The Prison Healer (Penguin Random House Australia, Penguin Books).

  • General Non-Fiction Book of the Year was awarded to She’s on the Money (Penguin Random House Australia, Penguin Life) by Victoria Devine.

  • The Edge of Thirteen by Nova Weetman (University of Queensland Press, University of Queensland Press) won Small Publishers’ Children’s Book of the Year.

  • The Matt Richell Award for New Writer of the Year was awarded to Amani Haydar for The Mother Wound (Pan Macmillan Australia, Macmillan Australia).

  • Audiobook of the Year went to Devotion (Macmillan Australia Audio, Pan Macmillan Australia) by Hannah Kent and narrated by Emily Wheaton.

 

Michael Gordon-Smith presented the 2022 Hall of Fame Awards. The Lloyd O’Neil Hall of Fame Award for outstanding service to the Australian book industry went to Sandy Grant, who has been devoted to books and publishing since launching his eponymous publishing business Hardie Grant 24 years ago.


The Pixie O’Harris Award was presented to Libby Hathorn for her consistent contribution to literature. For more than 50 years, Libby Hathorn AM, writer and former teacher-librarian, has been one of Australia’s most acclaimed authors of books for children and young people, as well as a tireless advocate for the importance of children’s literature.

 

Recipients of the industry business awards were Penguin Random House Australia (Publisher of the Year), University of Queensland Press (Small Publisher of the Year), Harry Hartog Bookseller (Book Retailer of the Year), Avenue Bookstore Albert Park (Bookshop of the Year) and Emily Hart from Hardie Grant won the 2022 Rising Star Award.


Michael Gordon-Smith, CEO of the Australian Publishers Association, said: “After an extremely difficult two years for writers, publishers and booksellers, it’s inspiring to see the wealth of talent, innovation and courage in the Australian book industry. Clearly, we are a nation of book lovers, and the Australian Publishers Association is proud to play a role in sharing and uplifting our country’s unique stories.”


Multi-award-winning actor, singer and musical theatre star Alinta Chidzey hosted the 2022 ABIAs, showcasing Australia’s best authors and exciting new talent. Alinta was joined on stage to present the awards by Wendy Whiteley, The Wiggles, Michelle Law, Peter Fitzsimons, Adam Goodes, Adam Spencer and Ellie Laing, among others.


Australian Book Industry Award Winners 2022 ABIA Book of the Year
• Love & Virtue, Diana Reid (Ultimo Press, Ultimo Press)

 

Audio Book of the Year
• Devotion, Hannah Kent; narrated by Emily Wheaton (Macmillan Australia Audio, Pan
Macmillan Australia)

 

Biography Book of the Year
• My Adventurous Life, Dick Smith (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin)

 

Book of the Year for Older Children (ages 13+)
• The Prison Healer, Lynette Noni (Penguin Random House Australia, Penguin Books)

 

Book of the Year for Younger Children (ages 7–12)
• The First Scientists: Deadly Inventions and Innovations from Australia’s First Peoples, Corey Tutt (Hardie Grant Publishing, Hardie Grant Explore)

 

Children’s Picture Book of the Year (ages 0–6)
• Somebody’s Land: Welcome to Our Country, Adam Goodes and Ellie Laing, illustrated by David Hardy (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin)

 

General Fiction Book of the Year Proudly presented by BorrowBox
• Before You Knew My Name, Jacqueline Bublitz (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin)

 

General Non-Fiction Book of the Year Proudly presented by the Copyright Agency
• She’s on the Money, Victoria Devine (Penguin Random House Australia, Penguin Life)

 

Illustrated Book of the Year
• Everything I Love to Cook, Neil Perry (Murdoch Books, Murdoch Books)

 

International Book of the Year
• The Storyteller, Dave Grohl (Simon & Schuster US, Simon & Schuster Australia)

 

Literary Fiction Book of the Year
• Love & Virtue, Diana Reid (Ultimo Press, Ultimo Press)

 

Small Publishers’ Adult Book of the Year
• Dropbear, Evelyn Araluen (University of Queensland Press, University of Queensland
Press)

 

Small Publishers’ Children’s Book of the Year Proudly presented by McPherson’s
• The Edge of Thirteen, Nova Weetman (University of Queensland Press, University of
Queensland Press)

 

The Matt Richell Award for New Writer of the Year Proudly presented by Simpsons Solicitors
• The Mother Wound, Amani Haydar (Pan Macmillan Australia, Macmillan Australia)

 

Hall of Fame Awards:

 

Lloyd O’Neil Hall of Fame Award
• Sandy Grant

 

Pixie O’Harris Award
• Libby Hathorn

 

Business Award Winners:

 

Book Retailer of the Year, sponsored by XL Express
• Harry Hartog Bookseller

 

Bookshop of the Year, sponsored by Alliance Distribution Services:
• Avenue Bookstore Albert Park

 

Publisher of the Year, sponsored by Overdrive:
• Penguin Random House Australia

 

Small Publisher of the Year, sponsored by Readings:
• University of Queensland Press (UQP)

 

Rising Star Award:
• Emily Hart (Hardie Grant)

LATEST NEWS

Ballarat.jpg
Play brings First Nations perspective

[Tim Bottams, Times News Group]

Later this month, the Creswick Theatre Company will put on Extinction: The Ballad of Pirt Koorrook with shows at the town’s courthouse and a final performance at Ballarat’s Eureka Centre.

Language.jpg
Healing and pride through preschool kids learning Aboriginal language and culture

[Georgia Kondek, ABC]

Regional children are now being taught Aboriginal language and culture from preschool until high school with regular content being adapted into the local dialect. 

Coralie-Cassady[5201].jpg
TAIHS Board does a Donald Trump by cancelling vote at general meeting

[by FNT]

Members of the Townsville Aboriginal and Islander Health Service (TAIHS) are shocked and deeply disturbed by the conduct of the TAIHS Chair, Michael Illin, who illegally cancelled an ORIC-sanctioned advertised general meeting on the evening of 9 June moments before a vote on a no-confidence motion in the Board was to be tabled.

LR-sign.jpg