Number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in out-of-home care is a national shame  

[supplied by SNAICC]

Image: supplied

SNAICC CEO Catherine Liddle described new figures revealing one in 18 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children is in out-of-home care as a "national shame".

A new report by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare released today shows that 18,862 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children were in out-of-home care at June 2020.

"This is 11 times the rate for non-Indigenous children. It is a disgrace,” Ms Liddle said.

"While we have the National Agreement on Closing the Gap, and we’re working with governments on a new national plan for child protection, the numbers of our children in out-of-home care keep rising.

"This report shows that our child protection systems are not investing in prevention and supporting families.

"Our kids cannot afford to wait. We need action and investment now to improve the lives of our young ones and families at risk."

Only 16% of the $6.9 billion investment in child protection systems is spent on supporting families.

SNAICC has undertaken a national consultation to inform the next 10-year Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander child protection plan.

“The messages are consistent across the country – there aren’t enough supports for families and support services that are culturally safe.

“Families fear seeking help because instead of getting support they end up in a pipeline to permanent removal of their children.”

The report also shows that only 52.4% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in out-of-home care were living with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander carers.

“Our children are being separated from their cultures. This causes lifelong and intergenerational harm,” Ms Liddle said.

“People everywhere have told us that there’s a lack of opportunity for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to participate in decisions about the care and protection of children. Our families and communities know best how to keep our children safe and cared for in connection with their cultures, but best practice models like independent Aboriginal family-led decision-making aren’t being used in most cases.

“Governments have made landmark commitments under the National Agreement on Closing the Gap to partner with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to reduce the over-representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in out-of-home care by 45% by 2031.

“But governments need to invest now in community-controlled organisations to support our families, prevent child protection intervention, and keep children safe in family, community and culture.

“It is past time for agreements to turn into action. Our kids can’t wait.”

LATEST NEWS

Gippsland.jpg
Gippsland community discusses Aboriginal employment plan

[Jedda Costa, ABC]

Aboriginal leaders gathered at Lakes Entrance to discuss some of the barriers inhibiting job prospects throughout First Nations communities and the ways forward to address major gaps.

'I'm black and proud': Saints unveil Winmars Indigenous guernsey alongside documentary

[saints.com.au]

The round will launch alongside the Winmar-led documentary, The Ripple Effect, and affiliated program Point + Be Proud, which aims to educate the community about the ongoing impacts of racism on Indigenous mental health and wellbeing. Point + Be Proud will be delivered through schools and sporting organisations across Melbourne's south. 

Arrente sacred objects return.jpg
Arrernte ceremony in Alice Springs celebrates the return of sacred objects  

[by Martin Freckman]

Senior Arrernte lawmen welcomed with a ceremony in Alice Springs the return of sacred objects from the United Kingdom and the planned return of objects from the most significant collection of Australian Indigenous art and craft held in North America.

LR-sign.jpg