First-Nations-banner-Learn-more-about-th
first-nations-telegraph-email-artwork.jp
LR-sign.jpg

How to find your immunisation information

[supplied by Teresa Mullan]

Image: supplied

Australian Digital Health Agency Consumer Advocate, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Champion and CoChair of the Agency’s Reconciliation Working Group and national Medicines Safety Program, Steve Renouf, said recent upgrades to My Health Record have increased the visibility of immunisations information via desktop or mobile device.

 

He noted accessing immunisations information in My Health Record can be done easily, whenever and wherever, via desktop or mobile directly or viewed via one of two apps (Healthi and HealthNow) currently available.

 

“If you go directly into My Health Record through myGov you can view what’s in there and add or remove information. If you use one of the two apps you can view information that is already in your record,” he said.

 

“You need to have linked your My Health Record to your myGov regardless of if you go direct or use an app.

 

“Recent changes to My Health Record include a new consolidated view of immunisation information that draws from the Australian Immunisation Register and any shared health or event summaries.

 

“You can use My Health Record to prove if you have a medical condition that makes you eligible to get an early Covid-19 vaccination. If the information has been uploaded, healthcare providers will have visibility of any of your pre-existing conditions and medicine history at the time of immunisation, which may be useful in assessing potential allergic reactions or side effects.

 

“It’s important for healthcare providers to have access to as much of your medical history as possible especially if you have never seen them before. This should ideally include what medicines you are taking and if you have an underlying condition or had an adverse reaction or allergy.

 

“If you plan on getting immunised this information is critical. Check what information is already in your record so you can talk to your healthcare providers about uploading missing documents or do it yourself.

 

“It is important for you to have up to date contact information so that you can get notifications, including changes to your immunisation information.”

 

Steve also said there were 22.91 million people with a My Health Record in February 2021 and nearly 90 per cent of those records have some form of data in them, including more than 15 million with immunisation information.

 

There are also nearly six million Shared Health Summaries and more than 200 million medicine documents in the system.

LATEST NEWS

Shirleen-Campbell.jpg
Calls for federal government attention on Indigenous women’s safety

[Cameron Gooley, ABC]

If the government is serious about listening to women, especially Aboriginal women, we'd welcome the new cabinet taskforce to visit us in Alice Springs to see what we do on the frontline and listen to our solutions.

Aboriginal people have the solutions to ending deaths in custody

[The Guardian]

The federal government must stop handballing the crisis of Aboriginal deaths in custody among NIAA and the Departments of Home Affairs and the attorney general, and passing off responsibility to states and territories.

New recruits join innovative retail trainee program in the Torres Strait  

[by Gavin Broomhead]

The participants are aiming to gain a Certificate I in Retail Work Skills by the end of their six-month traineeships, which are funded through the Queensland Government Department of Employment, Small Business and Training’s Skilling Queenslanders for Work (SQW) initiative.