Crue takes first steps to become a Paramedic

[by Greg Chapman]

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Image: supplied

Crue Hoskins’ desire to give back to his community as a paramedic has received a significant boost thanks to CQUniversity’s training and a scholarship provided by BHP.

Crue, a First Nations man, who is studying online in Cairns, was awarded a CQUniCares BHP Indigenous Scholarship, valued at up to $20 000 over two years to go towards his Bachelor of Paramedic Science studies at CQU.

Crue was drawn towards a career as a Paramedic while completing an electrical apprenticeship.

“I am an electrician by trade, which is something I fell into rather than pursued on my own,” he said.

“The looming guilt of not studying or learning something pushed me into a trade I didn’t truly have much passion towards. Applying myself often became a battle of willpower over willingness and from early on, I knew it would not be what I would continue to do for a career. Finalising my apprenticeship, did however, teach me core skills and necessary attributes which I am grateful for.”

Becoming a Paramedic became Crue’s priority in an effort to make a difference.

“Ultimately, giving back to my community and driving towards an equal healthcare continuum was what I realised I wanted to do,” he said.

“Personal mental and physical health is something that I strive to understand as thoroughly as possible. I’ve unfortunately felt the effects of both physical and mental health, as have those closest to me.”

“I believe with better understanding of the human body, I can personalise assistance and more effectively treat anyone I may come across in my hopeful career in the health industry. Through the knowledge and understanding that I can develop through CQU undertaking Paramedic Science I feel I can truly strive and sincerely hope to make a real difference in every health situation I encounter, whether it be for myself, friends, or complete strangers.”

Crue acknowledged that taking up Paramedic Science studies while completing his apprenticeship was challenging, but it helped him learn valuable lessons.

“Finishing the apprenticeship in tandem with beginning a university degree gave me a unique insight into how much I missed, truly wanting to learn and understand a subject. Actively studying every day after work gave a sense of clarity, as if I’d found something I wanted to throw myself into without having to trick myself or convince myself into just getting through it,” he said.

“Currently I am aiming to complete this degree with the intent of performing well and developing a fundamental understanding of health overall so that I may pursue further studies as a physician in the future.”

He thanked BHP for the scholarship.

“This scholarship is more than just the money, which I am very fortunate to gain. It will allow me to completely focus on my study to become the best, most educated version of myself,” he said.

“Having this immense support from BHP ensures I can focus on my own educational pathway and therefore relay my achievements and become a role model for the community around me.”

“BHP’s values of sustainability, integrity, respect, performance, simplicity, and accountability are certainly core standards in which I will implement and uphold throughout my career.”

The CQUniCares Scholarship program changes lives and CQU is grateful to partner with organisations like BHP who share the University’s passion for making a difference in the lives of our students, their families and our communities.

Crue was one of four students to be awarded a CQUniCares BHP Indigenous Scholarship in Term 2, 2022, joined by fellow scholars Ashleigh Boileau, Zhanae Dodd, and Stephanie Pasco. Tayla Greenalsh was also awarded a CQUniCares BHP Community Scholarship.

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